LES RESEARCH

Misaligned Versus Straight Placement of Anterior Cervical Plates: A Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes Study, JAAOS

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Pencle FJFrancis SDFrancis CASeale JAHothem EA.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, published in the Journal of the AAOS, here.

Background

In anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF), misaligned plates are concerning because of the risk of screw-and-plate failure; however, these plates also hypothetically have the potential for asymmetric micromotion on the facet and uncovertebral joint. The aim of this study was to determine whether misaligned plate placement during ACDF had clinical benefits compared with straight plate placement.

Methods

Postoperative AP radiographs of 128 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with anterior cervical plate (ACP) fixation were reviewed, and plate alignment was assessed. Patients were separated into control group 1 (straight plates) or group 2 (misaligned plates).

Results

The mean age of patients was 51.5 ± 0.9 years, and women represented 51% of the total population. There was no significant difference between groups with regard to the preoperative visual analog scale (VAS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores (P = 0.744 and P = 0.943, respectively). At 6 weeks postoperatively, the VAS scores for group 1 decreased from 7.6 ± 0.2 to 4.0 ± 0.2 compared with the scores in group 2, which decreased from 7.7 ± 0.2 to 2.1 ± 0.1, which demonstrated statistical significance (P = 0.019). At 2-year follow-up, no significant difference was demonstrated between the groups’ VAS and NDI scores (P = 0.670 and P = 0.266).

Straight placement

Straight placement

Misaligned placement

Misaligned placement

Conclusion 

Misaligned plates have increased torsional strength and are associated with better clinical outcomes compared with those of straight plates in the early postoperative period. After fusion, no significant difference in clinical outcomes between the groups was noted, which may reduce the concerns regarding misaligned plates.

Level of Evidence

Retrospective comparative study.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized Inset® LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Pencle FJFrancis SDFrancis CASeale JAHothem EA.

Author information

  1. From the Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, the Department of Orthopedics, Florida International University, Miami, FL (Dr. Chin), and the LESS Institute, Miami (Dr. Chin, Dr. Pencle, Ms. S. Francis, Ms. C. Francis, Dr. Seale, and Dr. Hothem).


Bleeding Risk with Ketorolac After Lumbar Microdiscectomy

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Sundram HMarcotte P.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, as published in Clinical Spine Surgery, here.

Abstract

There is a need to improve postoperative analgesia to support the trend to shorter hospitalization after minimally invasive spine surgeries. Ketorolac Tromethamine has proven efficacy in decreasing postoperative pain but there is concern with postoperative epidural bleeding after spine procedures. We prospectively assessed the incidence of bleeding complications after microdiscectomy in patients treated with a single 30 mg intraoperative dose of Ketorolac subsequent to wound closure. Group 1 consisted of 44 patients, 24 women and 20 men with mean age of 35.7 years (20 to 68 y) treated with Ketorolac. Group 2 consisted of 45 patients, 28 men and 17 women with mean age 46.8 years (32 to 74 y), who underwent discectomy without Ketorolac. Postoperative bleeding complications were monitored along with pain levels and time to discharge. We detected no significant postoperative changes in coagulation parameters or bleeding from the surgical site in either group. Both group 1 and 2 had averaged preoperative visual analog scale scores for leg pain of 8. Group 1 had an average postoperative visual analog scale score of 2.6 compared with 4 for group 2 two hours after surgery. Single dose intravenous Ketorolac provided beneficial analgesia without significant increase in risk of bleeding after microdiscectomy, enabling us to consistently perform microdiscectomy as an ambulatory procedure. Meticulous hemostasis should be accomplished before closure. Prolonged postoperative use is a promising alternative to narcotics.

About Author Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized Less Exposure Surgery by SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Sundram HMarcotte P.

Author information

  1. Spine Surgery Service, Department of Orthopaedics, University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. kingsleychin@hotmail.com

Avoidance of Wrong-Level Thoracic Spine Surgery Using Sterile Spinal Needles

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Seale JCumming V.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, also published in Clinical Spine Surgery, here.

Study Design

A technical report.

Objective

The aim of the present study was to present an improvement on localization techniques employed for use in the thoracic spine using sterile spinal needles docked on the transverse process of each vertebra, which can be performed in both percutaneous and open spinal procedures.

Summary of Background Data

Wrong-level surgery may have momentous clinical and emotional implications for a patient and surgeon. It is reported that one in every 2 spine surgeons will operate on the wrong level during his or her career. Correctly localizing the specific thoracic level remains a significant challenge during spine surgery.

Methods

Fluoroscopic anteroposterior and lateral views were obtained starting in the lower lumbar spine, and an 18-G spinal needle was placed in the transverse process of L3 counting up from the sacrum and also at T12. The fluoroscopy was then moved cephalad and counting from the spinal needle at T12, the other spinal needles were placed at the targeted operating thoracic vertebrae. Once this was done, we were able to accurately determine the thoracic levels for surgical intervention.

Results

Using this technique, the markers were kept in place even after the incisions were made. This prevented us from losing our location in the thoracic spine. Correctly placed instrumentation was made evident with postoperative imaging.

Conclusoins

We have described the successful use of a new technique using spinal needles docked against transverse processes to correctly and reliably identify thoracic levels before instrumentation. The technique was reproducible in both open surgeries and for a percutaneous procedure. This technique maintains the correct spinal level during an open procedure. We posit that wrong-level thoracic spine surgery may be preventable.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author and Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Seale JCumming V.

Author information

  1. Department of Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University †Institute for Modern and Innovative Surgery (iMIS) ‡LES Society, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

The Risks of Pedicle Wall Breech with Larger Screws After Untapping

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Gibson B.

Interested medical professionals can read the full paper, published also in the Spine Journal, here.

Background Context

A linear relation exists between the insertional torque when placing a screw and the ultimate screw pullout strength; therefore, undertapping of the pedicle followed by insertion of a larger screw may enhance the pullout strength of the screw.

Purpose

To report the risk of pedicle wall breech with placement of 6.2-mm pedicle screws after undertapping with a 5.2-mm tap and to evaluate the effectiveness of direct visualization to identify these breeches. STUDY DESIGN/SETTINGS: Prospective evaluation of risks of pedicle wall breech with undertapping for a larger screw and the utility of directly visualizing pedicle walls during access and placement of pedicle screws for evidence of breech.

Patient Sample

Sixty-five consecutive patients.

Outcome Measures

Intraoperative direct visualization of pedicle wall breech. Postoperative radicular leg symptoms.

Methods

We prospectively analyzed placement of pedicle screws in sixty-five consecutive patients during lumbar-instrumented fusions after laminectomies performed by a single spine surgeon. Forty-four patients were primary fusions, and 21 were revisions. Twenty-seven were male, and 38 were female, with a mean age of 54.7 years (range, 15-85 years). Four hundred twenty-eight total pedicle screws were placed for an average of 6.6 screws per patient (range, 2-12 screws).

Results

The incidence of pedicle wall breech during access was 0.7% (3/428) and 1.6% (7/428) after screw placement. 71% (5/7) of the screw breeches were noted with direct inspection of the pedicles intraoperatively, and 29% (2/7) were identified on postoperative X-ray films as lateral breakthroughs that were missed on intraoperative fluoroscopy and direct visualization. Therefore, 100% of misplaced screws potentially harmful to nerve roots were identified on direct visualization. Eighty percent occurred from L2-4.

Conclusions

This study provides evidence that undertapping of pedicles followed by placement of a larger diameter pedicle screw may breech the pedicle cortices. Although the risk is low, the authors recommend direct visualization of the pedicle walls during screw placement to identify caudad, medial, and cephalad breeches. This technique is for open laminectomies and should be added to the armamentarium of other techniques and not as a replacement.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board certified Harvard-trained orthopedic spine surgeon and professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Studies at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Gibson B.

Author information

  1. Spine Surgery Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 2 Silverstein, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. kingsleychin@hotmail.com

Mini-Open or Percutaneous Bilateral Lumbar Transfacet Pedicle Screw Fixation: a Technical Note

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Seale JCumming V.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, as published in Clinical Spine Surgery, here.

Study Objective

Case report.

Objective

To describe the technique used to place bilateral lumbar transfacet pedicle screws.

Summary of Background Data

Transfacet pedicle screw fixation is a growing alternative and biomechanically comparable with traditional pedicle screw fixation. There is no clear description of technique steps for placing transfacet pedicle screws available in the literature, despite recognizing that screw placement is not intuitive even with fluoroscopy, and is dissimilar to placing traditional pedicle screws or translaminar facet screws.

Methods

We present 2 illustrative cases where bilateral transfacet pedicle screws were placed for posterior instrumentation after a step-by-step technique that can be used in a mini-open or percutaenous procedure.

Results

Postoperatively, both patients had adequately placed transfacet pedicle screws bilaterally on x-ray imaging with 1 patient demonstrating fusion and intact fixation at 11 months follow-up.

Conclusions

Transfacet pedicle screws were successfully placed in 2 patients in a stepwise technique described to achieve lumbar fusion.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Seale JCumming V.

Author information

  1. Institute for Modern & Innovative Surgery (iMIS), Fort Lauderdale †Society of Facet Surgical Techniques and Technologies Inc., LES Society, Wilton Manors, FL.

Safety and Usefulness of Free Fat Grafts After Microdiscectomy Using an Access Cannula: a Prospective Pilot Study and Literature Review

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

Scientific Paper    Chin KR 1,  Bassora R ,  Yu WD .  Interested medical professionals can read the full paper, published also in the American Journal of Orthopedics,  here .   Abstract   Placing an interpositional fat graft over the dura has been practiced to prevent sciatica due to nerve tethering from scar. We assessed feasibility, outcomes, and complications of free fat grafts in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy for herniated discs using an access cannula. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 69 consecutive patients: those who received autologous fat graft (Group I) and those who did not (Group II). Clinical evaluation of leg pain and nerve tension sign was performed in the immediate postoperative period and at 1 month, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. The combined visual analog scale (VAS) scores for leg pain improved from 8.3 preoperatively to 1.3 (P < 0.5). The average VAS score for leg pain was 1.4 (0 to 3) in Group I and 1.3 (0 to 3) in Group II (P > 0.05). Ninety-one percent had resolution of their leg pain immediately postop and 96% at final follow-up. This study found no increased complications with the use of fat graft, but no clinical benefit, therefore the use of fat graft should be discouraged. The potential complication with the use of fat graft is the “mass effect” on the dura, and therefore, the width of the graft should be <1 cm.   About Author & Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Kingsley R. Chin    Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute   Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.   Learn more about Dr. Chin    here    and connect via    LinkedIn   .    About Less Exposure Surgery   Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at  LESSociety.org .    The LES Society philosophy : “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD    About The LESS Institute   The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our  patient stories , follow us on  Facebook  and visit  TheLESSInstitute.com  to learn more.   About SpineFrontier   The above study utilized LES Technology from  SpineFrontier  – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.   Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details    Authors    Chin KR 1,  Bassora R ,  Yu WD .   Author information   Charles E Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University and The Less Exposure Surgeons Surgery Institute (LESS Institute), Fort Lauderdale, FL. kingsleychin@Less-Institute.com.

Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Bassora R, Yu WD.

Interested medical professionals can read the full paper, published also in the American Journal of Orthopedics, here.

Abstract

Placing an interpositional fat graft over the dura has been practiced to prevent sciatica due to nerve tethering from scar. We assessed feasibility, outcomes, and complications of free fat grafts in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy for herniated discs using an access cannula. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 69 consecutive patients: those who received autologous fat graft (Group I) and those who did not (Group II). Clinical evaluation of leg pain and nerve tension sign was performed in the immediate postoperative period and at 1 month, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. The combined visual analog scale (VAS) scores for leg pain improved from 8.3 preoperatively to 1.3 (P < 0.5). The average VAS score for leg pain was 1.4 (0 to 3) in Group I and 1.3 (0 to 3) in Group II (P > 0.05). Ninety-one percent had resolution of their leg pain immediately postop and 96% at final follow-up. This study found no increased complications with the use of fat graft, but no clinical benefit, therefore the use of fat graft should be discouraged. The potential complication with the use of fat graft is the “mass effect” on the dura, and therefore, the width of the graft should be <1 cm.

About Author & Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Bassora R, Yu WD.

Author information

Charles E Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University and The Less Exposure Surgeons Surgery Institute (LESS Institute), Fort Lauderdale, FL. kingsleychin@Less-Institute.com.

Ideal Starting Point & Trajectory for C2 Pedicle Screw Placement: a 3D Computed Tomography Analysis Using Perioperative Measurement

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

christopher-campbell-40367-700x510.jpg

Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Mills MV2, Seale J3, Cumming V4.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, as published in The Spine Journal, here.

Background

C2 pedicle screws provide stable fixation for posterior cervical fusion. Placing C2 pedicle screws is fraught with risks, and a misplaced screw can result in cortical breach of the pedicle, resulting in injury to the vertebral artery or spinal cord.

Purpose

We sought to identify a reproducible starting point and trajectory for C2 pedicle screw placement using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) imaging. Our aims included identifying correct cephalad and mediolateral angles used for determining the most accurate trajectory through the C2 pedicle.

Study Design

A radiographic analysis of the anatomy of the C2 pedicle using CT.

Patient Sample

A random sample of 34 cervical spine CT scans in patients without medical or surgical pathology of the cervical spine.

Outcome Measures

Normal anatomic measurements made in the axial and sagittal planes of the CT scans. Angles and measures in millimeters were recorded.

Methods

The C2 pedicles were evaluated using CT scanning with a 3D imaging application. The ideal trajectory through each pedicle was plotted. The mediolateral and cephalad angles were measured using the midline sagittal plane and the inferior vertebral body border as references. Other measurements made were the distances through the pedicle and vertebral bodies, and the surface distances along the laminae between the isthmus and the starting point of the chosen trajectories. Other measurements involving the height of the laminae were also made. The mean values, standard deviations, and intraobserver variations are presented.

Results

CT scans from 34 patients were reviewed. The sex of the patient did not predict angle measurements (p=.2038), so combined male and female patient measures are presented. The mean mediolateral angle measured was 29.2°, and the mean cephalad angle was 23.0°. The mean distance along the lamina surface between the isthmus and the starting point was 8.1 mm. The mean distance from the superior border of the lamina to the starting point was 5.7 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between the dataset collected in duplicate by the same observer (p=.74); as such, we present one data analysis on combined data from the two datasets collected.

Conclusion

It is possible to determine an ideal trajectory through the C2 pedicle. These measurements may facilitate C2 pedicle screw fixation decreasing the risk of injury to the vertebral artery, spinal cord, or nerve roots. Delineating the individual anatomy in each case with imaging before surgery is recommended.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Mills MV2, Seale J3, Cumming V4.

Author information

  1. Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University and LESS (LESSurgeons) Institute, Division LESSpine Institute, 1100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Suite #3, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311, USA. Electronic address: kingsleychin@gmail.com.

  2. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA.

  3. LESS (LESSurgeons) Institute, Division, LESSpine Institute, 1100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Suite #3, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311, USA.

  4. Less Exposure Surgery (LES) Society, 300 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Suite 502, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334, USA.

Stability of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Setting of Retained Facets and Posterior Fixation Using Transfacet or Standard Pedicle Screws

Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Reis MT2, Reyes PM2, Newcomb AG2, Neagoe A2, Gabriel JP3, Sung RD4, Crawford NR2.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, as published in the Spine Journal, here.

Background Concept

The transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) technique supplements posterior instrumented lumbar spine fusion and has been tested with different types of screw fixation for stabilization. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is usually placed through a unilateral foraminal approach after unilateral facetectomy, although extraforaminal entry allows the facet to be spared.

Purpose

To characterize the biomechanics of L4-L5 lumbar motion segments instrumented with bilateral transfacet pedicle screw (TFPS) fixation versus bilateral pedicle screw-rod (PSR) fixation in the setting of intact facets and native disc or after discectomy and extraforaminal placement of a TLIF technology graft.

Study Design

Human cadaveric lumbar spine segments were biomechanically tested in vitro to provide a nonpaired comparison of four configurations of posterior and interbody instrumentation.

Methods

Fourteen human cadaveric spine specimens (T12-S1) underwent standard pure moment flexibility tests with intact L4-L5 disc and facets. Seven were studied with intact discs, after TFPS fixation, and then with TLIF and TFPS fixation. The others were studied with intact discs, after PSR fixation, and then combined with extraforaminally placed TLIF. Loads were applied about anatomic axes to induce flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Three-dimensional specimen motion in response to applied loads during flexibility tests was determined. A nonpaired comparison of the four configurations of posterior and interbody instrumentation was made.

Results

Transfacet pedicle screw and PSR, with or without TLIF, significantly reduced range of motion during all directions of loading. Transfacet pedicle screw provided greater stability than PSR in all directions of motion except lateral bending. In flexion, TFPS was more stable than PSR (p=.042). A TLIF device provided less stability than the intact disc in constructs with TFPS and PSR.

Conclusions

These results suggest that fixation at L4-L5 with TFPS is a promising alternative to PSR, with or without TLIF. A TLIF device was less stable than the native disc with both methods of instrumentation presumably because of a fulcrum effect from a relatively small footplate. Additional interbody support may be considered for improved biomechanics with TLIF.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author and Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Reis MT2, Reyes PM2, Newcomb AG2, Neagoe A2, Gabriel JP3, Sung RD4, Crawford NR2.

Author information

  1. Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Building 71, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The LES Spine Institute, 1100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Suite #3, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311, USA. Electronic address: kingsleychin@imissurgery.com.

  2. Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, 350 W Thomas Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA.

  3. Department of Orthopedics, Grant Medical Center, 111 South Grant Ave, Columbus, OH 43215, USA.

  4. The Spine Center at The Colorado Springs Orthopaedic Group, 3010 North Circle Dr, Suite 200, Colorado Springs, CO 80909, USA.

Stabilizing Effects of a Particulate Demineralized Bone Matrix in the L4 Interbody Space with and Without PEEK Cage – A Literature Review and Preliminary Results of a Cadaveric Biomechanical Study

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Bruce C1, Chin KR2, Cumming V3, Crawford NR4.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, also published the West Indian Medical Journal, here.

Abstract

We reviewed the biological elements supporting the usefulness of a specifically designed particulate form of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) with spinal fusion, and report some limitations of its use described in the medical literature and in the interbody space using a cadaveric biomechanical model. A literature review and description of the techniques used to augment spinal fusion are presented, including a more thorough review of recent findings of cadaveric biomechanical flexibility studies using DBM alone at different percentage fills of the existing disc space and DBM with a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody cage. The need for DBM was established by reviewing limitations of autografts and allografts in spinal fusion. Demineralized bone matrix used alone did not increase stability post discectomy at L4-L5, but was demonstrated to exhibit satisfactory stability when used with a PEEK interbody cage. There may be a future role for DBM that hardens and fills disc space more rigidly, overcoming this limitation to its use.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Bruce C1, Chin KR2, Cumming V3, Crawford NR4.

Author information

  1. Department of Surgery, Radiology, Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica.

  2. Charles E Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University and the Less Exposure Surgeons Surgery Institute (LESS Institute), Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. kingsleychin@gmail.com.

  3. Less Exposure Surgery Society, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.4Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Effects of Misalignment on Static Torsional Strength of Anterior Cervical Plate Systems

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Scientific Paper

Chin KR1, Cumming VBHenson MMurrell BChan FW.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, as published in the Spine Journal, here.

Background

There is little understanding of cervical plate misalignment as a risk factor for plate failure at the plate-screw-bone interface.

Purpose

To assess the torsional strength and mode of failure of cervical plates misaligned relative to the midsagittal vertical axis.

Study Design

Plastic and foam model spine segments were tested using static compression and torsion to assess effects of misaligned and various lengths anterior cervical plate (ACPs).

Methods

Different length ACPs and cancellous fixed angle screws underwent axial torsional testing on a servo-hydraulic test frame at a rate of 0.5°/s. A construct consisted of one ACP, four screws, one ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene inferior block, and one polyurethane foam superior block. Group 1 had ACPs aligned in the midsagittal vertical axis, group 2 plates were positioned 20° offset from the midline, and group 3 had the ACP shifted 5 mm away and 20° offset from midline. Torques versus angle data were recorded. The failure criterion was the first sign of pullout determined visually and graphically.

Results

Group 1 had a more direct screw pullout during failure. For the misaligned plates, failure was a combination of the screws elongating the holes and shear forces acting between the plate and block. The misaligned plates needed more torque to failure. The failure torque was 50% reduced for the longer versus the shorter plates in the neutral position. Graphically shown initial screw slippage inside the block preceded visual identification of slippage in some cases.

Conclusions

We observed different failure mechanisms for neutral versus misaligned plates. Clinically, misalignment may have the benefit of needing more torque to fail. Misalignment was a risk factor for failure of the screw-bone interface, especially in longer plate constructs. These comparisons of angulations may be a solid platform for expansion toward a more applicable in vivo model.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1, Cumming VBHenson MMurrell BChan FW.

Author information

  1. Institute for Modern and Innovative Surgery, 1100 W. Oakland Park Blvd, Suite #3, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311, USA. Electronic address: kingsleychin@imissurgery.com.