Love Your Back and It Will Love You Right Back

By Abagail Sullivan

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Content by Esther Rodriguez & Ana Williams

This Valentine’s Day, give a little love to the one who supports you most – your back. The muscles that maintain your movement and keep your life balanced deserve some TLC this February (and every month to follow!).

Treat Yourself (starting with your back)

Loving your back never felt so good! Massages help increase endorphins – the body’s natural painkiller – while providing healing nutrients to the affected area. Treat yourself to a spa day or save money and relax at home with a diffuser & tea tree oil (or even better, recruit the skills of your loved one!).

Cozy on up at Work

You may be working hard but your back doesn’t have to. Standing desks and ergonomic chairs are trending for good reason – as they help reduce fatigue and your risk of neck & back injury, while also increasing blood flow. Studies show that “spine friendly” workplaces have higher productivity, more employee engagement, better safety culture and lower costs due to less injuries.  

Upgrade Your Sleep Routine

It’s crucial to rest & rejuvenate with the right mattress. Experts recommend a change of mattress every eight years (you can also try flipping it to get the most out of yours!), so research and find the right one for you, being kind to your spine even while you hit the hay.

Shoe Support

Who doesn’t love an excuse to buy a new pair shoes?! Whether you’re walking for exercise or just getting from point A to point B, the shoes you wear play an important role in supporting your lower back. For a more personalized shoe experience, visit a specialized running store for knowledgeable recommendations regarding your best fit. Having the correct type of shoe will make all the difference – in both fitness enjoyment and injury prevention.

Get in Formation

… with stretching, yoga & morning mediation. 

Yoga poses are worth more than just a cool Instagram photo. This powerful form of exercise helps promote a healthy spine while stretching & strengthening key muscles of the back. Although there’s more to yoga than just the poses themselves, the versatility of this exercise makes it easy for anyone to join the fun – no matter your fitness level.

Focus on Form

Poor form can prompt injuries and slow gains, so taking precautions can help keep your spine healthy, as well as prevent back pain. Use the gym mirrors to your advantage and align your body correctly and smoothly through each exercise. Pay close attention to your breathing during your workouts. Exhale as you work against resistance and inhale as you release. And after a solid workout, remember to give your muscles time off to recover.

Need extra help getting that form down? Consider hiring a trained professional to teach you the ropes! Even if your budget doesn’t allow for regular sessions, seeing a trainer once every few weeks to touch up on form and learn new exercises can be a great investment for your back and overall health goals.

How do YOU “love your back” each day? Share with us below to spread the healthy back movement.


Setting Your New Year’s Resolution – & Keeping It

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Content by Esther Rodriguez & Ana Williams

As we ring in the new year, we inevitably ring in resolutions to follow – from fitness aspirations to lifestyle improvements, we all share a common end goal: to improve our lives in the upcoming year, by altering bad habits and fostering positive ones. But goal setting is more than making a wish and hoping it will come true. It’s about making it happen and sticking to it. This year, don’t promise the same old new year’s resolution just to find yourself given up by February. The biggest mistake we see are goals that are too broad, too big or too complex. Read on for your guide to setting a manageable new year’s resolution – and keeping it for good.

Tip #1: Recognize what you need to change.

Take a serious step back and consider what you feel you need or want more out of life. It could be as major as a big move, or as “minor” as dedicating more time to home cooking. Whatever will increase YOUR quality of life – make it happen.

Tip #2: Establish smart goals.

S.M.A.R.T. goals are those that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-based. Set these goals by writing them down, making them feel tangible. Then plan the steps you must take to realize that goal, and cross each off as you work through.

Tip #3: Begin a goal-directed activity.

The first step to achieving your goals is starting. Don’t let the prospect of hard work keep you from beginning. It takes just one step – and voila! You’ve begun.

Tip #4: Track your progress.

Tracking your progress doesn’t have to be intimidating, but it does need to hold you accountable. Whether it’s in baby steps or giant leaps, track your wins every time. This will serve as both proof of achievement and a motivator to keep you climbing for success.

Tip #5: Reward yourself.*

Perhaps the best step of all: reward. Don’t forget to celebrate your wins, even if it’s in a small way. You ran a mile every day last week? Highlight that by treating yourself to a new piece of gym swag. Or take a day off and pick back up twice as hard the following. Small wins are still wins.

*Just don’t go too easy on yourself! Goals are meant to challenge and better you – and hard work is tough for a reason. The easy path won’t get you to your desired destination, trust us. It’s all about a happy medium in rest & reward. You know your limits; establish those, stick to them & you’ll thrive.

Share below how YOU make & keep your new year’s resolution. How will you take 2018 by the horns?


Pro Cricketer Chris Gayle Chooses the LESS Institute for Surgery, Boasts Post-Procedure Record Breakers in BPL T20

By Abagail Sullivan

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Two years after international cricket star Chris Gayle underwent back surgery for a compressed nerve from a herniated disc at the LESS Institute, he’s trailing his journey to success in all the right places.

Professor Dr. Kingsley R. Chin performed successful orthopedic surgery on Gayle back in August 2015, and Gayle has been soaring ever since in continuing his remarkable record-breaking career.  Just one month after his procedure, Gayle was back to training. He returned to competitive play three months post-surgery, and re-began a saga of successes.

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Since then, Gayle has broken an international record to become the player to hit the most sixes in winning the ICC Twenty20 (T20) Internationals and has claimed victory at the most prestigious international cricket tournament, the ICC World Twenty20 Final, alongside his team members on the West Indies. As for his most recent breakthrough performance, Gayle had a record breaking stretch at the Bangledesh Premier League (BPL) T20 Final.

Records set in Gayle’s BPL performance:

  • First Century in T20 Finals 146 in 69 balls

  • Most sixes (18) to break his personal best

  • Fastest century in T20 Finals 100 in 58 balls

  • Crossed 11,000 run mark in T20, ahead of second-on-the-list player Brendon McCullum with 8526

  • First batsman to hit 20 hundreds in T20s and to smash 800 sixes in T20s, ahead of second-on-the-list player Kieron Pollard with 506

“We feel honored to offer world class care to patients & athletes like Chris Gayle, to get them back to their high competitive performance levels,”
— Dr. Kingsley R. Chin
Gayle with Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Kingsley R. Chin of the LESS Institute

Gayle with Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Kingsley R. Chin of the LESS Institute

Here’s to many more record breakers.

For more on The LESS Institute and our team’s work with professional athletes, visit our site and connect with us over on FacebookLinkedIn & Twitter.


The Guide to Your Most Active Holiday Season Yet

By Abagail Sullivan

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Content by Esther Rodriguez & Ana Williams of The LESS Institute

With all the hustle & bustle of the holiday season, it can feel close to impossible to find time to stay active. From dinner parties to cold winter weather, keeping our fitness goals on track becomes a struggle for the masses. Don’t let this time get in the way of your routine, but instead create your most active holiday season yet – and even better, kickstart your healthiest new year to come.

Run, Run, Rudolph 

Start a new family tradition by signing up for (and holding the fam accountable for) a holiday run. There’s no better time to listen to classic Christmas tunes than when participating in your local Rudolph Run. Prepping for a race, walk or obstacle course will give you an end goal in your motivation – and the kids won’t complain that “Jingle Bell Rock” is playing for the 100th time in a row… everyone wins!

Blaze the Trails

Gather the whole crew, grab some H2O and toss on your sneaks, because getting your heart rate up is only a few steps away. Whether you’re staying local or out of town, do your research ahead of time and find nearby hiking trails, state parks or botanical gardens (perfect spots for your latest Instagram pic) – or simply sidewalk it! As long as you’re out & about, you’re on track.

Refresh Mode

Swing sets & playgrounds may not be an everyday occurrence during the colder months, but now’s the time to shut down those tablets & bring the kiddos to the park. Sneak in a workout by playing a game of tag or throwing it back to the monkey bars. There’s only so much daylight this time of year – so make it last!

“Forced” Family Fun

We all love a good family competition, but instead of bringing out the charades box, opt for a friendly match. Avoid letting the food coma sink in post-mealtime & encourage the sports-themed family fun. Whether it’s for bragging rights or a silly team prize (like that extra gingerbread cookie) gather your loved ones and get your workout in effortlessly. Springing across a field to catch that football or score that goal will rival your traditional cardio & weights routine, no doubt.

Test out these favorites and let us know what YOU do to foster your active holiday season.


Clinical Experience and Two Year Follow up With a One-Piece Viscoelastic Cervical Total Disc Replacement

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Scientific Paper

Kingsley Richard Chin, Jacob Ryan Lubinski, Kari Bracher Zimmers, Barry Eugene Sands, Fabio Pencle

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, as published in the Journal of Spine Surgery, here.

The AxioMed Freedom Cervical Disc

The AxioMed Freedom Cervical Disc

Background

The purpose of this study is to present clinical outcome data from a 2-year post-market study of a viscoelastic one-piece cervical total disc replacement (TDR) in Europe.

Methods

Thirty-nine patients were implanted at five surgical sites in an European post-market clinical study. Clinical outcomes included improvement of neck disability index (NDI) and visual analog scale scores for neck and arm pain from baseline to 2-year follow-up, neurological examinations, patients view on the success of surgery, complications, and subsequent surgical interventions..

Results

Thirty patients had the Freedom® Cervical Disc (FCD) implanted at a single level, and nine patients were implanted at two adjacent levels. The population had a similar distribution of male [20] and female [19] subjects, with a mean age of 45 years. All self-administered outcome measures showed significant clinically important improvements from baseline to the 2-year follow-up. Mean preoperative NDI score improved from 48% to 20%, 13%, 8%, 6% and 4% at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Average preoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores of the neck, right and left arm pain intensity and frequency showed significant improvement. All neurological outcome measurements showed immediate improvement from preoperative values and continued improvement throughout 2 years follow-up. From pre-op to 24 months, neurological deficits declined in the population from 21% to 6% for reflex function, 62% to 17% for sensory function, and 38% to 3% for motor function. No patients experienced a deterioration in any measured outcomes compared with the preoperative situation. Patient satisfaction increased over 2 years post-op, with 83% of patients responding that they would “definitely” choose to have the same treatment for their neck/arm condition and another 11% responding that they would “probably” choose to have the same treatment.

Lateral flexion and extension X-rays of TDR at C6/C7 at 2 years. TDR, total disc replacement.

Lateral flexion and extension X-rays of TDR at C6/C7 at 2 years. TDR, total disc replacement.

Lateral flexion and extension X-rays of TDRs at C5/C6 and C6/C7 at 1 year. TDR, total disc replacement.

Lateral flexion and extension X-rays of TDRs at C5/C6 and C6/C7 at 1 year. TDR, total disc replacement.

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Conclusions

The FCD performs as expected in patients with single-level and two-level degenerative disc disease.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Kingsley Richard Chin¹, Jacob Ryan Lubinski¹, Kari Bracher Zimmers¹, Barry Eugene Sands², Fabio Pencle³

Author information

¹AxioMed LLC, Malden, MA, USA; ²RQMIS, Inc. Amesbury, MA, USA; ³Less Exposure Surgery Society, Malden, MA, USA Contributions: (I) Conception and design: All authors; (II) Administrative support: KB Zimmers, BE Sands; (III) Provision of study materials or patients: BE Sands; (IV) Collection and assembly of data: BE Sands; (V) Data analysis and interpretation: BE Sands, KB Zimmers; (VI) Manuscript writing: All authors; (VII) Final approval of manuscript: All authors. Correspondence to: Kari Bracher Zimmers. AxioMed LLC, Malden, MA, USA. Email: kzimmers@axiomed.com

Eligibility of Outpatient Spine Surgery Candidates in a Single Private Practice

By Dr. Kingsley Chin

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Here, Becker’s ASC Review highlights 4 key points from this LES Society study conducted in part by The LESS Institute team.

Scientific Paper

Chin KR1,2, Pencle FJR2, Coombs AV3, Packer CF3, Hothem EA3, Seale JA2.

Interested medical professionals can read through the full paper, also published in Clinical Spine Surgery, here.

Study Design

Level III.

Purpose

To retrospectively review the eligibility of surgical patients meeting predetermined outpatient surgery criteria in a single-surgeon private practice.

Summary of Background Data

There is a burgeoning awareness among patients, surgeons, and insurers of the cost benefits and safety of outpatient spine surgeries. At the end of 2014, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have released its final 2015 payment rules and codes for spinal decompression and fusion. This move confirms the safety of procedures being performed in the ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs).

Methods

We conducted a database review between 2008 and 2014 and identified 1625 orthopedic procedures. All nonsurgical spine procedures were excluded from the study. Eligibility for outpatient spine surgery was based on criteria generated from a combination of published standard of care for major operations and the chief surgeon’s experience. A matched cohort based on type of surgery in each facility of all spine surgery patients was created, group 1 (hospital patients) and group 2 (ASC patients).

Results

A total of 708 patients underwent spinal surgery during this time period with a 53% female population. A total of 557 of 708 (79%) patients were eligible for outpatient spine surgery. There were 210 surgical procedures in group 1 (inpatient) comprised of 72 decompression and 138 fusion procedures. In group 2 (outpatient), there were 347 procedures made up of 150 patients undergoing decompression and 197 undergoing fusion or disc replacement. To confirm that hospital procedures are eligible to be performed in the ASC, the χ test was performed. We found that ASC-eligible hospital patients can indeed be done in an ASC (P=0.037).

Conclusions

Outpatient spine surgery is feasible in 79% of patients in this single-surgeon private practice. On the basis of these results, a majority of spine procedures can be performed in an outpatient setting following our eligibility criteria.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Scientific Paper Author & Citation Details

Authors

Chin KR1,2, Pencle FJR2, Coombs AV3, Packer CF3, Hothem EA3, Seale JA2.

Author information

  1. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University and Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University.

  2. Less Exposure Surgery Specialists Institute (LESS Institute).

  3. Less Exposure Surgery Society (LES Society).


Feel Jollier All Season Long with These Healthy Holiday Choices

By Abagail Sullivan

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Content compiled by Esther Rodriguez & Ana Williams

The holidays are so close, we can practically taste that home cooked comfort food. With all the creaminess and goodness it’s no wonder the average American gains a few pounds between Thanksgiving and New Years. Fortunately for us, this season doesn’t have to consist of dodging one food-focused frenzy after another. We can still enjoy the same delicious flavors we love, while cutting unhealthy fat and making a few tweaks to the classics – creating an all around healthier holiday.

Mashed Potatoes

Did you know that with every spoonful of mashed potatoes you serve yourself, you’re adding heaps of empty carbs and calories – and that’s before the added goodies like butter, gravy & cheese!? Stay light on your feet by making mashed cauliflower instead. It has the same texture and similar flavor – while staying a lot more belly-friendly.

Pies

Pie is an American classic, but try substituting one on your dessert table for baked, roasted or grilled fruit. If you’re a peach cobbler fan, try grilled peaches! This way, your guests will get the fruity sweetness they crave, minus the buttery, carb-heavy, calorie-dense crust.

Green Bean Casserole

Creamy green bean casserole is a go-to tradition for the turkey-day table (and a sorry excuse for a veggie!) With fried onions, butter, cheese, salt and cream of mushroom soup, this side’s ingredients are far from friendly. Toss in some oven-roasted Brussels sprouts for a savory, fiber-packed veggie or stick with the green bean classic, but sauté them over low heat in extra virgin olive oil and season with sea salt & black pepper instead.

Creamed Spinach

Spinach is a source of a lot of goodies for our body – like fiber, vitamins A, C, E & K, folate, calcium, iron and more – but when we load that with saturadated fats, the whole “health” aspect is sort of rendered useless. This year, sauté those leafy greens in heart-healthy extra virgin olive oil and garlic, or toss a spinach salad – dressed with balsamic vinaigrette and topped with sliced apples or peas & toasted walnuts or pecans for added flair.

Stuffing

In place of a heavy, white-bread loaded side dish, try quinoa, couscous or faro-based stuffing to cut down on cholesterol, saturated fat and empty carbohydrates. When these grains are blended with all the other stuffing ingredients, you won’t even be able to taste the difference between the traditional vs. healthy versions. 

Sweet Potato Casserole

We know, the melted marshmallows and brown sugar are to die for! But this year, try drizzling your baked sweet potatoes with a sauce made from extra virgin coconut oil, maple syrup, fresh grated ginger and pumpkin pie spice. While the syrup adds sugar, it acts as an unrefined form of the sweetener, which contains more natural nutrients.

Sour Cream

Our holiday favorites that “require” sour cream – from mashed potatoes to casseroles and sauces – can so simply be made healthier by subbing in nonfat Greek yogurt. And there’s no need to increase the amount – just a dash of ‘plain’ incorporated in the recipe, and your dish is just as delicious as it would be with its creamy cousin counterpart.

What approachable healthy holiday choices do you make? Next up, we’ll cover “amping up your healthy holiday” – highlighting ways in which we can get foster a healthier seasonal environment.

Inspired by Health.com’s 20 Healthy Holiday Food Swaps You Need to Try


Maximum Flavor, Minimal Guilt: Six Surprising Pumpkin Health Benefits

By Abagail Sullivan

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It’s a fruit! It’s a squash! It’s a PUMPKIN. 

Who doesn’t love pumpkin season? From classic decor to seasonally tasty treats, this fall favorite has become a true symbol of autumn. Luckily for us, this season’s ‘superfood’ has health benefits galore – and doesn’t have to be another major indulgence among holiday madness. Check out these six good-to-know pumpkin health benefits, fostering maximum flavor and minimal guilt.

Content compiled by Esther Rodriguez & Ana Williams of The LESS Institute

Clear That Vision
Filled with beta-carotene and almost twice the recommended daily intake of vitamin A, a pumpkin’s bright orange hue promotes good vision – especially in dim light, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Keep Your Hunger at Bay
Pumpkin seeds are not only fun to eat, they’re high in fiber – which helps keep you full longer and promotes digestion.

Ward off Disease
A serving of pumpkin can contain 50% of your daily recommended vitamin K, which has recently been found to safely suppress the growth of some cancers.



Promote Your Healthiest Heart
Pumpkin seeds are also rich in potassium, vitamin C, and essential fats that can help lower the risk of hypertension and contribute to a healthy heart.



Sleep like a Baby
Can you feel that Thanksgiving-day sleepiness already? The tryptophan found in pumpkin seeds is that feel-good amino acid that helps you relax and unwind. Pumpkin seeds promote better sleep – so go ahead, take that post-Turkey-day nap!

Foster Positive Vibes
Ask someone what their favorite holiday is and chances are, it’s Thanksgiving. The serotonin found in pumpkins is known to improve the mood of those consuming this flavored pie – so it’s no wonder fall holidays are the happiest time of year.

Check back for more helpful health & wellness tips from our LESS Institute team – and let us know your favorite pumpkin health benefits (and topics you’d like to see covered), below!


Five (More) Quick Fixes for a Healthy Diet

By Abagail Sullivan

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A Dietitian Gives us the Skinny on Healthy Eating

Content by Kristina Ghafari, MS, RD, LDN, guest contributor

  1. Shop the perimeter of the grocery store.

    This ensures you’re shopping mostly for produce, proteins and dairy.

  2. Make sure you have lean protein in your diet.

    Lean protein, along with fiber and healthy fats, help with satiety to keep you feeling fuller longer, which can be extremely helpful for weight loss and maintenance. Some good sources of lean protein are: fish, turkey, chicken, beans, egg whites, cottage cheese and Greek yogurt.

  3. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.

    Sometimes when you feel hungry, your body is actually thirsty. Try drinking a glass of water before you eat something.  Thirst is also a late sign of dehydration -so when your brain tells you you’re thirsty, you’re already somewhat dehydrated.

  4. Cut down on foods that can cause inflammation.

    The most common offenders are gluten and dairy. Inflammation in your body can set the stage for heart disease, diabetes and other chronic conditions.[1]

  5. Tweak your meal plan.

    Tweaking your meal pattern is just as important as the types of food you consume for a healthy diet. Try to eat 5-6 smaller meals daily. Frequent meals help keep your blood sugar stable and your metabolism active.

[1] http://www.health.harvard.edu/family_health_guide/what-you-eat-can-fuel-or-cool-inflammation-a-key-driver-of-heart-disease-diabetes-and-other-chronic-conditions


Wellness Wednesdays: Safety on the Job

By Abagail Sullivan

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The importance of safety on the job goes far beyond the individual – it affects families, careers and futures.

The LESS Institute is proud to be Department of Labor (DOL) approved to receive worker’s compensation patients in their network, as well as in Rockport Healthcare Network – a national network services solution. In 2016 alone, there were 7,406 DOL Workers’ Compensation claims involving the back.

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The following stats show the surprising number of workers in Florida who injure their backs while on the job.

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If you’ve been injured on the job, resulting in back and neck pain, call the LESS Institute at 1-855-411-LESS for a consult today. We are enrolled and ready to help.

And check out the following resources for information pertaining to Workers’ Compensation in Florida:

http://www.myfloridacfo.com/division/wc/employee/faq.htm

http://www.myfloridacfo.com/Division/WC/pdf/WC-System-Guide.pdf